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  1. #531
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    ....and on "feral hogs" down here in Texas....

    ...from the Texas Monthly article...

    ""The feral hog menace is no joke: Texas has more than 2.6 million feral hogs—that’s enough to replace every man, woman and child within Houston’s city limits—and left unchecked, that population can double every five years. One legislative estimate put hog damage—from broken fence posts, lost livestock, ruined crops—at $400 million per year. They’re also increasingly encroaching on urban areas: in the Dallas suburb of Irving, 239 hogs have been trapped since last October. “I think when people got home and heard from their constituents, they found out this is a serious problem, not a Sarah Palin moose-hunting joke,” Miller said.

    Hunting from a helicopter is “probably one of the most effective ways to take out a large number of feral hogs,” said Scott Vaca, Assistant Chief of Wildlife Enforcement at Texas Parks and Wildlife. “They get educated to traps very quickly. With aerial gunning, you can get to places that maybe you can't drive to, but you can fly there and find them and flush them out of cover.” Since 2004, aerial gunners have killed some 79,000 hogs. But wildlife officials estimate that, just to hold the population steady, sixty percent to seventy percent of the state’s hogs must be killed every year. Under the old law, only the pros could aerial hog hunt, and they charged landowners up to $600 an hour for the service. Now, people looking for a novel hunting experience will pay for the luxury of shooting from the air, which will shift the cost from burdened landowners to enthusiastic sport hunters.

    I didn’t want to just get in a helicopter and start shooting. Before taking to the skies, I attended the Vertex Helicopter Aerial Hunter Safety Class, where I spent a long June morning in a classroom in a hangar at the edge of Houston’s Hobby Airport. As portable air conditioners whirred, I was schooled on the scope of the hog problem, the rules for aerial hunting, and how to shoot an AR-15 from a moving helicopter. (Handy tip: Don’t drop the magazine mid-flight; it can fall out and knock out the chopper’s tail rotor.)

    I furiously took notes as Vertex President Mike Morgan flipped through a PowerPoint presentation about the safety concerns presented when unloading a semi-automatic rifle from a helicopter. Morgan, whose muscles filled out the Vertex employee uniform of a tan flight suit, is an Army-trained helicopter pilot who flew scouting missions during Operation Desert Storm. “We’re here basically to exterminate these 400-pound rats,” he boomed.

    Tough façade aside, safety and professionalism are foremost in Morgan’s mind. A slew of helicopter hunting videos have cropped up on the Internet, and he screened several during the class as cautionary tales. In one, a man aimed a loaded AK-47 at the cameraman. Another showed a man pointing his weapon up into the rotor system. In a third, a national ABC news spot that aired in May, an Abilene-based helicopter pilot flew his chopper under a set of wires. That’s one of the most dangerous things a pilot can do, Morgan said. “Over 95 percent of wire strike accidents are fatal.” If people get to the skies and start acting like cowboys, accidents will happen, a major concern for the fledgling industry. “A lot of people think it’s a legalized sport now,” Morgan said. “It’s not a sport; it’s an extermination program.”
    ....""After four hours in the classroom, we flew out to Anahuac for an afternoon of aerial target practice. For the first twenty minutes of the hour-long flight to Anahuac, I clutched the helicopter’s doorframe in fear. The doors had been removed—the better to shoot out of the chopper—and so the only thing separating me from the ground was my seatbelt, which I checked several times out of anxiety. Morgan calmed me over the headset and, by the time we reached Baytown, I felt confident enough to remove my hand from doorframe to send a tweet. (“This tweet comes to you from a helicopter. #thismodernlife.”)

    Six weeks later, I found myself making the long drive from Austin to Knox City, a speck of a town in God’s Country, twenty miles as the chopper flies from our governor’s childhood home of Paint Creek. A tractor painted like the Texas flag greeted me at the outskirts of town, and hanging over the one stoplight in town was a banner announcing that the Annual Donald Johnson Memorial Seedless Watermelon Festival would be held the last weekend in July.

    I pulled up to the Rockin’ Grill Steakhouse where I met Dustin Johnson, the lanky 24-year-old owner of Cedar Ridge Aviation whose family has lived in the Knox City area for more than a hundred years. (It turns out the advertised watermelon festival is named after his grandfather, who developed and grew the world’s first seedless variety with the help of two scientists.) As we waited for early evening, the time the animals emerge from their wallows, Dustin and his co-workers from Cedar Ridge Aviation regaled me with tales of hog hunting as we ate brisket sandwiches. (Not hog, disappointingly. When prepared correctly, feral hogs are supposed to be delicious, as Phillip Meyer chronicled in this September 2011 piece for TEXAS MONTHLY.)

    Their company, which started conducting aerial hog depredation two years ago, has exterminated thousands of hogs in the six-county area surrounding Knox City. He told me that the new law has generated an extraordinary amount of interest, and he already has thirty helicopter hunting trips scheduled for after September 1, including one for a group of ATF agents from New York. (A legal loophole allowed me to hunt with Dustin two months before the new law goes into effect. In fact, it has always been legal for someone to hunt from a helicopter so long as no money changes hands for the flight.) He informed me that I was only the second woman he had ever taken helicopter hunting, and the first, an 85-year-old with many African game safaris under her belt, gunned down 25 hogs on her own ranch. Dustin also boasted that in March, he took Ted Nugent on a hog hunt and, the Nuge, being the Nuge, bagged close to 150 pigs.* I felt outmatched.

    After dinner, we drove east of Knox City down State Highway 22 to the helicopter, which Dustin keeps in a metal barn that used to store piles of seedless watermelons. On our eleven-mile flight to his 640-acre family ranch, we flew for a stretch along the bone-dry Brazos River, which was bisected by trails of tiny hog hoof prints. Dustin pointed out the mud wallows hogs had dug to keep cool, the places where they had rooted up the dry riverbed (perhaps looking for some aquatic delicacy that had survived the drought), and the rows of crops that had been trampled by hungry pigs.

    We also flew past a wheat field where Dustin had killed 64 hogs that week. Vultures were swarming the carcasses, and when we got closer to the field, hundreds flapped up from a cluster of trees near the banks of the Brazos where they had been roosting. Even vultures enjoy bacon.

    To aid my hunt, that morning Dustin had baited two areas on the ranch with deer corn and wheat seed, and feral hogs were feasting at both sites. He lined shot after shot up for me, positioning the helicopter on the right side of the pigs each time, but I kept missing. While YouTube clips make helicopter hunting seem like a videogame, it’s actually quite difficult. An hour passed, and my lackluster marksmanship scared off all the pigs. In a last ditch effort to score a kill, we landed so could Dustin call a neighbor for permission to shoot on his land. Permission secured, we flew over to the nearby 25,000-acre spread of wheat fields and pastures. Dustin assured me they’d killed more hogs on this ranch than anywhere else, gunning down 223 there in two hours last year.

    It was here we saw the sounder of pigs in the pond. When one of the largest pigs broke away from the group, I squinted and aimed my laser sight at her back. Dustin lined up the copter, keeping her on my left side. We hovered about twenty feet above her, and I squeezed the trigger. Then I fired again. She crumpled into a heap. Picking herself up again, she slowly moved into some brush, where she collapsed. We made a second pass, and I discharged a few more rounds into the injured sow until she stilled.

    “I killed one!” I exclaimed with a little too much glee as we landed. Dustin gave me a high five, and then we worked together to drag the 200-pound carcass out of the brush, towing her some 150 feet back to the helicopter for a photo op. Her open eyes were glassy, and a tusk curled out of her mouth.

    Because of me, there’s one less feral hog roaming around Texas.""

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/NEqniHpOHqE?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390">


  2. #532
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    ...and another video from the guys at Cedar Ridge Aviation....

    Comments from their channel and then the video. Keep in mind that any feral hog that I shoot goes on the pit if possible. However, with the numbers that we have tearing up crap here in Texas on large ranches it's better to tag them with a round and let the coyotes eat them....

    ""This feral hog eradication program is funded by a group of farmers who are taking progressive action to reduce the devastation done to their crops by these animals. Each and every feral hog is estimated to cause $1400 in crop damage during its lifetime. As you can see this data in combination with the extraordinarily high and ever expanding hog population proves to be a very big problem. Through the support of the farmers of Haskell Co. the hog population is on its way to a more controllable state as well as a much higher crop yield for the farmers.""
    "" In the beginning when the footage shakes a lot on each shot it is an AK47 shooting FMJ's. That's why you see the bullet hitting behind the animal and it takes more shots. The second half is an AR-15 shooting .62 grain hollowpoints. Much more stable footage as we built a solid camera mount and the bullets are much more effective.""

    VIDEO!!... WARNING! IF YOU ARE FROM PETA or TREE HUGGER DON'T WATCH DUE TO EXTREME DAMAGE TO FERAL HOGS!

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/AqouXFdTV0w?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390">

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/CPLWzJ_TUPw?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390">


  3. #533
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    The salmon I buy is fresh alaskan sockeye. But, I just cant get it to turn out right. I have used cedar and hickory planks, lemons and so on. But just not right. Maybe it is the temperature or the time of cooking. But it is either over cooked or under...

  4. #534
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paid
    The salmon I buy is fresh alaskan sockeye. But, I just cant get it to turn out right. I have used cedar and hickory planks, lemons and so on. But just not right. Maybe it is the temperature or the time of cooking. But it is either over cooked or under...
    ...."paid", I'll make a few calls to my friends tomorrow as I am off work and see what I can come up with for you as i am sure the fish you are cooking isn't cheap.

    ....I'll see what i can come up with. Invest in a digital thermometer that has the probe you can place right next to the fish/meat as the one I have has saved my tail numerous times when temps were in question. They go pretty cheap as the one I depend on is less than $20.....


  5. #535
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    ..picked some peppers this fine Sunday night as I waited for the darn sun to go down! Might have missed a few as I was using a darn flashlight!

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_IlfpchQbvY?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390">

    ....as I stated i plan on building a small green house to keep the plants going this winter so I have a head start next year! :wink:

  6. #536
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    ...someone asked about the plants that I was picking both the habanero and jalapeno peppers from so just braved the heat outside and made the following video. Might be the extreme heat we are having here in Texas this summer...not sure. But the peppers sure seem to like it!!

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/IJSvnXvRoAk?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390">


    ...here is another Habanero Sauce recipe that I across this afternoon along with some variations to the recipe..

    Ingredients:
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    2 large carrots, chopped
    2 medium-sized red tomatoes, cut into quarters
    Quarter of one Spanish onion, cut into strips
    3 habenero peppers, cut in half
    3 cloves of garlic, cut in half
    Juice of one lime
    2 tablespoons white vinegar
    Salt to taste

    Procedure:

    Heat the oil in a skillet on medium heat. Add the carrots and let them cook for about five minutes. Then add to the skillet the onion, tomatoes, habaneros and garlic cloves and cook, stirring occasionally.

    Transfer skillet contents to a blender and add lime juice, vinegar and pulse (can add a bit of water, a tablespoon at a time if it’s too thick.
    (NOTE: Try Chicken stock instead of water!) Salt and pepper to taste.

    --== Warning: This salsa is extremely fiery, so please be cautious! And if you have latex gloves, I highly recommend using them when chopping the peppers.==--

    You might want to also add some cilantro and a pinch of cumin as well.

    Habaneros are more versatile than most people think, but for the most part, they are incorrectly prepared. I'm sure you all know that the finer you mince garlic, the more garlic flavor you will taste. With habaneros, the finer you mince it, the less heat you will taste. Since this chile contains an extraordinary amount of heat, mincing it very finely will make it taste better in the incorporated dish. This works especially well with fresh Pico de Gallo. If you want to use the chile in a cooked meal, you should char the habanero over an open flame until blackened; afterward discard the skin and mince. This will release the natural sweetness and smokiness hidden within the chile thus balancing the heat. Try this method with your hot sauce recipes. It will still be hot, but not unbearable and with better flavor.

    ....ENJOY~!!~! :lol:



  7. #537
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    ....since I have all these darn peppers both out there on the plants as well as a crap load in the freezer that I still haven't fooled with I have been looking for some other ways to use them. My grilling nerdery comes out whenever I order "barbecue wings" and get fried chicken tossed in barbecue sauce. I'm not saying that can't be good, but if I'm ordering barbecue wings, I want all the greatness of smoky chicken with layers of sauce baked into the wing. Chain restaurant wings usually pizz me off to no end as I can do much better!

    Now I may get some flack here. Admittedly, when I make barbecue wings, I don't go low-and-slow. The merits of slow cooking—turning an otherwise tough piece of meat into something irresistible like I do with my briskets and pork butts—are lost with wings, which benefit more from a crisp crust and just a little smoke, best achieved with a high temperature indirect cook.

    Rubbed wings stay juicy and get a nicely browned skin after about 30 minutes of cooking, at which point barbecue sauce is applied and let to caramelize. Another coating of sauce and some time directly over the coals creates the the layers of sauce that I love. It's a little sticky, a little charred, and just overall delicious.

    This particular batch were coated with a roasted habanero sauce, because a touch of heat on a smoky wing just makes it all the better, right?
    ...I said RIGHT???!!!


    Here we go!



    --== Habanero Barbecue Wings ==--

    Ingredients:
    For the sauce......

    3 cloves garlic
    2 habanero chiles
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 small onion, finely chopped
    2 tablespoons finely chopped green bell pepper
    2 cups tomato sauce
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1/4 cup honey
    1/4 cup molasses
    3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    3 tablespoons dark brown sugar (TURBANADO RAW CANE!!)
    2 tablespoons yellow mustard
    Kosher salt to taste

    For the rub..

    1 tablespoon paprika
    1 teaspoon granulated garlic
    1 teaspoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

    3 lbs of chicken wings, cut like you like them!
    1 or 2 chunks of Oak,Hickory,or Pecan if you have it!

    --== WARNING!! THE PEPPERS WILL GAS YOU OUT OF THE HOUSE WHEN THIS STEP IS DONE!! Can you picture a Kitchen full of PEPPER SPRAY? BE CAREFUL AND WEAR GLOVES!!

    TO MAKE THE SAUCE:
    Heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat. Place garlic cloves and habaneros in the skillet and cook, turning occasionally, until they are blackened in spots, about 10 minutes. Remove from skillet and let cool. Peel and roughly chop garlic. Seed and roughly chop habaneros.

    Heat olive oil In a medium saucepan over medium heat until shimmering. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned. Add garlic, habaneros, and green bell pepper and cook for 1 minute. Add tomato sauce, vinegar, honey, molasses, Worcestershire sauce, sugar, and mustard and stir to combine. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until thickened, stirring occasionally, about 20 to 30 minutes. Season with salt to taste. Pour sauce into the jar of a blender and puree until almost smooth. Pour sauce into a jar and store in refrigerator until ready to use, up to two weeks.

    TO MAKE THE WINGS:
    To make the wings: Combine paprika, granulated garlic, salt, black pepper and cayenne in a small bowl to make the rub. Place chicken wings in a large Ziploc bag and sprinkle in the rub. Seal bag and toss wings to evenly coat with the rub. Store in refrigerator up to one day (optional).

    GRILL: Weber,Old Smokey, etc....

    Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover gill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grill. Add the wood chunk(s) on top of the charcoal, and once burning and producing smoke, place the wood chunks on the side of the charcoal so it doesn't burn up and just smokes. Place the wings on the cool side of the grill, cover, and cook over medium-high heat until skin is browned and crisp, about 30 minutes. Brush wings all over with sauce, cover, and let cook until sauce caramelizes, about 5 minutes. Brush with sauce again and move wings to the hot side of the grill. Cook until slightly charred, about 2 to 3 minutes. Remove wings to a platter and serve immediately.

    ...REMEMBER, IF any of your guests think the sauce is too hot milk or some other dairy product will kill the heat faster than beer,tea, or ice water. Matter of fact beer and ice water in my humble opinion makes the heat worse!!

  8. #538
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    .....A little advice from someone who uses habaneros all the time: As long as you are not eating large pieces of habanero chile, the heat is quite bearable. You'll actually get more fruitiness than heat. And you can avoid using gloves if you simply cut a slit through the center of each habanero with a paring knife. Mexicans use this chile floating method with many broths and soups instead of quartering or dicing the chile. I have even used them instead of jalapenos in my beans. You can either make a slit in the pepper and let it float in the bean pot or if you are some Yankee that thinks the peppers that are included with the pizza you ordered are "hot" just throw one or two in the pot without cutting them open.

    ....seriously, one or two peppers with a slit down the side will add very little heat to the beans or whatever you are cooking. The taste is quite a bit different from any other chile I cook with.

  9. #539
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    .....was checking my subs at youtube and was sent this one. "FPSRUSSIA" down in Georgia has the guys over for some guns and grub!

    <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/kMyPD1VKk60?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="700" height="420">

  10. #540
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    Gavelston, im from the UK and tbh we don't get wild boar over here...any chance you know a good recipe for some spicey but delicious chicken? Thanks

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