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  1. #501
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    ......I'm not a huge fan of crab cakes. I mean, they're good and all, but I have many other favorite ways to eat crabmeat. I must admit, though, that a good crab cake can really hit the spot. Here's a good one. It's based on a recipe from Chef Kevin Graham, formerly of Windsor Court Grill Room and Graham's Creole Café in New Orleans.

    --== Louisiana Crab Cakes ==--

    * 3/4 pound crabmeat (claw crabmeat is a tasty and inexpensive option for crab cakes)
    * 1 yellow onion
    * 1 red bell pepper
    * 2 ribs of celery
    * 2 teaspoon each of dried basil and dried thyme
    * 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
    * 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    * 1/2 tablespoon Creole mustard
    * 2-1/2 tablespoons real mayonnaise (Use MiracleWhip and I'll SHOOT YA!)
    * 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
    * 1/2 tablespoon Tabasco, Crystal or your favorite Louisiana hot sauce
    * Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    * French bread crumbs (make 'em yourself, don't buy 'em)
    * Egg wash (2-3 eggs, lightly beaten)
    * Flour

    Clean the crabmeat, removing all cartilage and shells. Sauté onion, red bell pepper, and celery until the onion is translucent. Add Worcestershire and hot sauce and herbs to vegetable mixture. Cool the vegetable mixture.
    Mix crabmeat, vegetable mixture, mustard, mayonnaise, salt and pepper with enough bread crumbs to hold the cakes.
    Form 2-3 ounce cakes.
    Dredge in seasoned flour, egg wash, and seasoned breadcrumbs (sequentially).
    Pan-fry until golden and finish browning in oven.

    Serve with a drizzle of remoulade sauce.

    Are you kidding? My mom would slit my throat if she thought I was giving out her shrimp remoulade recipe. It's the best in the world, better than I've had in many of Louisiana's finest restaurants. Here are two variations...both are Killer!!

    Here are a couple of different recipes, beginning with Chef John Folse's recipe for shrimp remoulade as he serves it in his Donaldsonville, Louisiana restuaruant, Lafitte's Landing; also, the remoulade recipe from Tujague's Restaurant in the French Quarter.

    --== Chef John Folse's Shrimp Remoulade ==--

    * 1 1/2 cups heavy-duty mayonnaise
    * 1/2 cup Creole mustard
    * 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
    * 1 tsp hot pepper sauce (Chef Folse likes Louisiana Gold, but Tabasco will do)
    * 1/2 cup finely diced green onions
    * 1/4 cup finely diced celery
    * 2 tbsp minced garlic
    * 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley
    * 1/2 tbsp lemon juice
    * salt and cracked black pepper to taste
    * 3 dozen 21-25 count boiled shrimp, peeled and deveined

    In a mixing bowl, combine all of the above ingredients, whisking well to incorporate the seasonings. Once blended, cover and place in the refrigerator, preferably overnight.

    --== A minimum of four hours will be required for flavor to be developed.==--

    When ready, remove from refrigerator and adjust seasonings to taste. Place six shrimp on a leaf of romaine or other colored lettuce and spoon a generous serving of remoulade sauce on top of the shrimp. Do not sauce shrimp prior to service, as they will lose their firm texture. Serves 6.




    .....Here's the shrimp remoulade recipe from the 131-year-old Tujague's Restaurant, on Decatur Street in the French Quarter.

    --== Tujague's Shrimp Remoulade ==--


    * 1 cup ketchup
    * 2 tablespoons horseradish
    * 2 tablespoons yellow mustard
    * 2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
    * Dash Tabasco
    * 4 hard boiled eggs, chopped
    * 2 raw eggs, beaten

    * 1 gallon water
    * 1 package crab boil
    * 3 tablespoons salt
    * 36 large raw shrimp (Peeled and deveigned!)
    * Shredded lettuce

    Mix the first seven ingredients in a glass bowl. Chill in the refrigerator 4 hours.
    In a large pot, bring the water, crab boil and salt to a full boil.
    Add shrimp. When the water returns to the boil, turn off the heat and let the shrimp sit for 5 minutes to absorb the seasonings.
    Drain the shrimp, cool them.
    Place 6 shrimp on a plate lined with shredded lettuce and top with 4 tablespoons of the sauce. Repeat 5 more times. Serves 6.

    ....for the crab cakes make either version of the remoulade sauce to drizzle over your crab cakes...or make the recipe with the shrimp!

    .....Damn, gonna have to head down the bayou when the shrimp come back into the Bay and break out my cast net! Have a "honey hole" where a pipe comes off the rice field and empties into a deep hole at the end of a slough that I can barely get a flat bottom into...but always holds some nice 20/26ct shrimp that are still kickin' when they hit the boiling pot here!!


  2. #502
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    ....as some of you here Stateside...as well as you others that may be fortunate enough to live where they actually allow you to own and hunt with something other than a "BB Gun" wild Hog is a pretty darn good source of meat that you can cook up at any time of the year.

    Here in Texas we are allowed to hunt them year round and with the blessings of the Texas Parks and Wildlife folks the more we can kill the better! Rifle...pistol...shotgun...or compound bow it makes no difference as long as you make a clean kill. Mama and the Kids..as well as the neighbors will eat good that's to say the least! Here is a good recipe that you can use if you are planning on feeding the "Family Reunion" or just want to have some nice meat to pack away in the freezer for winter time!

    --== Cochon du Lait (Louisiana Smoked Pig) ==--

    Yield - 100 -125 Buffet Servings

    Ingredients
    1 90 - 125 LBS HEAD ON PIG (Split lengthwise)
    2 CUPS GARLIC CLOVES (Peeled, whole)
    2 BUNCHES SHALLOTS (Washed, root bottoms removed)

    Dry Seasonings

    2 TBSP Sea SALT
    1 TBSP BLACK PEPPER
    1 TBSP GROUND CAYENNE PEPPER
    1 TBSP WHITE PEPPER
    4 TBSP GRANULATED GARLIC
    2 TBSP SPANISH PAPRIKA

    Pit

    20 10’ LENGTHS OF 1/2” or 3/4” EMT CONDUIT
    1 SPOOL BAILING WIRE
    5’x 6’ EXPANDED METAL GRATING
    LOT HARDWOOD (Pecan, Oak, or Hickory)
    1 QUART COOKING OIL

    Method

    Cut an “X” in the pig meat with a sharp fillet knife. Stuff one or two cloves garlic into each hole, then stuff a shallot into the hole. Cut the shallot at the skin line. Continue stuffing the pig in all the meaty areas until all of the garlic and shallots are used.
    Don’t forget to include the underside of the pig.
    Mix the seasonings in a stainless steel bowl and dust the pig generously. Pat the seasonings into the pig flesh.

    Pit Construction

    Dig a 5 foot by 6 foot pit about 12 to 18 inches deep. Cut 3-1/2 foot long pieces from the conduit,. Hammer the cut pieces into the ground, leaving about 14” to 18” sticking out of the ground.
    Use the bailing wire to lash the longer piece to the stakes to form a grill. Before you put the grating over the pit, wad up newspaper and other kindling and place in the bottom of the pit.
    Stack 20 to 25 pieces of hardwood in the pit and douse with the cooking oil.
    Next, place the grating on top of the pit and secure with bailing wire. Run a hose to the pit, this is a great safety measure and might come in handy if the pigs start to burn!

    Cooking Method

    About 14 hours before service, light the pit and allow the wood to burn down to embers. (This will take about 1 -1/2 to 2 hours.) Remove some of the glowing coals and start a breeder fire on side of the cooking pit. Add fresh hardwood to the breeder fire so that when additional coals are required they can be pulled from this fire.

    The grill temperature should be very warm but not hot. A good check is to hold your hand over the grill for about 10 seconds without discomfort.
    If you can hold it there for any extended period than the grill is too cold. If you cannot hold it there greater than 5 seconds, the pit is too hot and the grease from the pigs will catch fire and burn the meat.

    Place the pig halves skin down on the grill, ensure that no open flame is directly below the meat. Add hot embers to maintain the grill temperature.
    Place a piece or two of your wood at the edge of the coals to get the smoke going.
    Turn the pigs about once each hour. As the pigs cook, they will drip grease into the embers and a column of smoke will rise over the pigs and give them a smoky flavor.
    Concentrate the embers under the shoulders and hams; these areas are thicker and require more heat for the pig to cook evenly. If a flame develops under the meat pat it out with the back end of a shovel.
    Sometimes a fire will start and more fire fighting measures are required, first try shoveling some dirt on top of the grease fire, or use a rake to spread out the coals. As a last resort use the hose to douse the fire. You may have to replenish embers from the breeder fire.

    Smoke- roast the pig halves for 11 - 13 hours. When done the meat will literally fall from the bones.

    Most fresh pigs that are store bought are very fatty and thus require little basting. However, wild pigs come directly from the woods and are very lean. For these I suggest that a butter-garlic-wine basting sauce be available during cooking. This will keep the meat moist and tender.


    Serve the ribs and center section first, these are the thinner sections of the pig and are usually done first. The hams and shoulders are thicker and the meat will continue to cook internally for a while after they are removed from the pit.

    ....We usually leave the hams whole but take the roasts and make "pulled pork" for Po-Boys and the like or bag it up for serving at a later date.


  3. #503
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    ....if you are on a budget...or just want something that is easy as heck to make and will stick to your ribs and put you in a coma here is a good one!

    ---== ROUND STEAK AND GRAVY WITH ONIONS ==----


    This is Cajun food at its simplest. You've probably never heard of this dish, nor are you likely to see it on a menu or in a cookbook. However, as Cajun cook and food writer Marcelle Bienvenu said, it's almost certain that if you asked any native of southwest Louisiana "who lives along Bayou Lafourche or Bayou Têche or on the prairies near Ville Platte or Crowley about this dish, he would confess that round steak in gravy is one of his favorites."

    * 1 two-pound round steak, not too thick, with the round bone with the marrow in the middle
    * 3 large onions, sliced
    * 2 bell peppers, chopped
    * 1 Clove fresh garlic
    * Few pinches sugar
    * 1 cup beef stock or water
    * Salt, cayenne and freshly ground black pepper, to taste.
    * White rice

    Cut the steak into 3/4" squares, and season well with salt and cayenne pepper. In a deep iron pot, put enough cooking oil just to cover the bottom and get the oil fairly hot. Add the meat and brown it well, almost to the point where you worry you may burn it. You can sprinkle a little sugar in the pot as well, to help the meat turn a nice shade of brown.

    Add the stock or water, and sc**** up all the little brown bits that stuck to the bottom of the pot. Add the onions,crushed garlic, and peppers, reduce the heat, cover and cook for about 1 hour until the meat is tender. Stir occasionally, and add a little more stock or water if you want more gravy.

    To serve, spoon the steak and gravy over white rice, and serve maque choux on the side.


    ---== MAQUECHOUX (Three ways) ==---


    Pronounced "MOCK SHOE", this is a dish that the Cajuns got from the Native American tribes that populated southwest Louisiana. It's wonderful, and you can vary the recipe by adding chicken, crawfish tails or even crabmeat. But most of the time I like it just like this ...

    * 1 dozen ears fresh sweet corn (Frozen Works)
    * 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter
    * 1-1/2 cups onions, finely chopped
    * 1 large green bell pepper, finely chopped
    * 1 large red bell pepper, finely chopped
    * 3 ribs celery, finely chopped
    * 3 large ripe tomatoes, peeled, seeded and roughly chopped
    * 2 teaspoons salt
    * 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    * 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
    * 4 tablespoons sugar
    * 1 cup evaporated milk

    Shuck the corn and remove all of the cornsilk. Hold each cob over a bowl and cut the kernels away in layers (don't cut whole kernels), then sc**** the knife along the cob to get all of the "milk" out of it.

    Melt the butter in a large saucepan or pot over medium-high heat. Add the onions, bell peppers, celery and tomatoes and saute until the onions are transparent, about 10 minutes. Stir in the salt and peppers, then add the corn and milk from the cobs, the sugar and evaporated milk and stir well. Reduce heat to medium and cook until the corn is tender, about 10-15 more minutes. Adjust seasonings to taste.


  4. #504
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    ---== BARBECUED SHRIMP ==---


    This dish has nothing to do with a barbecue pit or barbecuing. Why is it called "barbecued" shrimp? Beats the hell out of me. If you're really curious, ask someone at Pascal's M****e Restaurant on Napoleon Avenue in New Orleans; it's where the dish was created.
    Me, I don't care. This dish is so good you can call it whatever you want. Just, um, don't have it every day. You'll know why immediately when you see the first ingredient listed:

    * 2 pounds butter (Yes, you read right. Two pounds. Eight sticks. Don't whine. DO NOT use margarine! Real butter only.)
    * 2 tablespoons Creole seasoning, to taste; OR
    2 - 3 teaspoons cayenne pepper and 3 - 4 teaspoons black pepper, to taste
    * 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary leaves
    * 1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce
    * 6 ounces good beer (microbrewery is preferable to mainstream swill)
    * 5 - 10 cloves garlic, finely minced (or as much as you like)
    * 1 medium onion, very finely minced
    * 3 ribs celery, very finely minced
    * 3 - 4 tablespoons chopped parsley
    * 2 teaspoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice
    * 4 pounds shrimp, heads and shells on

    [This feeds 8-10 people, BTW ... cut it in half if you need to.]

    Melt a stick of the butter in a skillet. Saute the garlic, onions, celery, parsley, rosemary and seasoning blend for about 2 - 3 minutes.

    Melt the rest of the butter. Add the beer (drink the rest of the bottle). Add the sauteed stuff, Worcestershire and lemon juice.

    Drown the shrimp in the seasoned butter, using as many baking dishes as you need. Make sure the shrimp are more or less submerged. If they're not ... melt more butter and add to the sauce. (Aah, what the hell ... what's another stick or two when you're already up to these butterfat levels?) Bake in a 350 degree oven until the shrimp turn pink, about 15 minutes.

    Serve in big bowls. Put in a handful of shrimp and ladle lots of the spicy butter sauce over it. Roll up your sleeves and wear a bib (DO NOT wear nice clothes when eating this!) Serve with plenty of French bread to sop up da sauce!

    Try to avoid going to have your cholesterol and triglycerides taken for a few weeks afterward. Remember that this is a special treat. Don't eat this all the time if you want to live. But hey, every now and again ... LIVE!


    As with lots of New Orleans cooking, there are a zillion ways to do this. Here are two more....

    I've never had BBQ Shrimp at a Brennan's restaurant, but I assume it's the same idea as BBQ Shrimp every where else in New Orleans. I'm not sure where the first one's from, but the second is from "Recipes and Reminiscences of New Orleans" (vol 1, Ursuline Academy Parents' Club, 1971). I'll list both sets of ingredients, but the cooking instructions are the same for either:

    BBQ Shrimp #1:

    * 8-10 lbs shrimp
    * 1 lb butter
    * 1 lb margarine
    * 6 oz Worcestershire sauce
    * 8 tbs black pepper
    * 1 teaspoon rosemary
    * 4 lemons (sliced)
    * 1 teaspoon Tabasco
    * 4 teaspoons salt
    * 2-4 cloves garlic

    BBQ Shrimp #2:

    * 8 lbs whole shrimp
    * 1/2 lb butter
    * 1 cup olive oil
    * 8 once chili sauce
    * 3 tbs Worcestershire sauce
    * 2 lemons, sliced
    * 4 cloves garlic, chopped
    * 3 tbs lemon juice
    * 1 tbs parsley
    * 2 teaspoons paprika
    * 2 teaspoons oregano
    * 2 teaspoons red pepper
    * 1 teaspoon Tabasco
    * 3 tbs liquid smoke
    * salt and pepper to taste

    "Wash shrimp. Spread out in shallow pan. Combine ingredients in sauce pan over low heat and pour over shrimp. Refrigerate. Baste and turn shrimp every 30 minutes while refrigerated for several hours. Bake at 300 degree for 30 minutes, turning shrimp at 10 minute intervals. Serve in soup bowl with French bread to dip in sauce."

    When I cook it, I mix and match ingredients and add seasoning of my own, but I'd pretty much start with the second version. I did mention that those Ursuline Parents' Club cookbooks (vols 1 and 2) are great, and every fan of N.O. cooking should have them, right? ;-)

    BTW, there's also a recipe for BBQ Shrimp in Paul Prudhomme's first cookbook, but the second one above is close to definitive, IM(NS)HO.


    Bar-B-Cued shrimp #3

    * 8-10 pounds jumbo shrimp, heads and shells on (20 shrimp/pound)

    * sauce:
    * 1 pound butter
    * 1 teaspoon ground rosemary
    * 1 pound margerine
    * 4 lemons sliced
    * 6 oz. Lea and Perrins 1 teaspoon tabasco
    * 8 tablespoons finely ground black pepper
    * 4 teaspoons salt
    * 2-4 cloves garlic (optional, but not with me)

    ....in a saucepan melt butter and margerine. add worcestershire, pepper, rosemary, lemon slices, tabasco, salt, garlic and mix thoroughly.
    Divide shrimp between two large shallow pans and pour heated sauce over each. Stir well. Cook in a 400 degree oven about 15-20 minutes, turning once. Shells should be pink, the meat white and not translucent.

    ...BE FOREWARNED...This stuff is very rich so make sure you have a designated driver so you don't fall "asleep at the wheel" on 'da way home!!....

  5. #505
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    .....I had this at the Palace in New Orleans a few years ago and luckily just found this recipe. Try this one out to really have a good meal!

    ---==== SHRIMP TCHEFUNCTE from the Palace Café ====---


    The Tchefuncte River, located north of New Orleans, was named after a local Native American tribe that once inhabited the area.

    The word "meunière" is French for "miller's wife", and refers to a style of cooking whereby food (usually fish) is seasoned, lightly dusted with flour and sautéed simply in butter. The sauce made from these drippings is combined with lemon juice and parsley.

    This Creole version, as prepared by the Palace Café in New Orleans, is adapted from this and enhanced to create a creamy blend of tastes.

    Rice Pilaf:

    * 4 tablespoons butter
    * 3 cups converted rice
    * 1 medium onion, medium dice
    * 6 cups chicken stock

    Heat a 5 quart saucepan, then add butter and melt. Add onions and rice. Brown rice and onion on high heat, stirring constantly. Add the chicken stock, bring to a boil and stir. Reduce heat to low and let simmer, cover and cook for approximateliy 20 minutes. Check for firmness, uncover and let sit for 10 minutes.

    Meunière sauce:

    * 3 lemons, peeled and quartered
    * 7 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
    * 3 tablespoons Crystal hot sauce
    * 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream (UK: single cream)
    * 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
    * 1/4 teaspoon salt
    * 1/4 teaspoon white pepper

    Preparing the meuniere sauce: In a large sauté pan combine the lemons, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce and whipping cream. Blend with a wire whisk over medium heat, stirring constantly, for 3-4 minutes. As you stir, press gently on the lemon quarters to slowly release the juices. Slowly add the butter by pinching off a little bit at a time and squeezing it through your fingers into the sauce pan, stirring constantly (this is called mounting the butter). As you add the last of the butter, remove from heat and continue to stir. Taste, then season with salt and pepper. Strain through a fine strainer. The sauce is now ready to serve; cover and keep warm.

    Sautéed Shrimp:

    * 3 cups white button mushrooms (or mix/substitute crimini or shiitake mushrooms if you like)
    * 60 medium shrimp
    * Salt and freshly ground black pepper
    * 3 cups chopped green onions (scallions)
    * 6 tablespoons butter

    Wash shrimp in cold water and season with salt and pepper.
    Melt the butter in a medium sauté pan, then add shrimp, green onions and mushrooms.
    Cook over medium heat for 3-4 minutes, stirring constantly until shrimp just turn pink. When ready to serve, add the meunière sauce and heat through -- do not overcook the shrimp!

    To serve: Place the rice in a ring mold or cup (a shallow coffee cup will work fine). Invert the cup over the corner of the plate and lift slowly. Spoon Shrimp Tchefuncte around 3/4 of the rice. Yield: 6 servings

  6. #506
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    Sonofabitch, year-round open season on wild pigs in Texas?

    OMG that sounds delicious. Are they hard to hunt? Do you stalk, push, sit in a stand, just take a stroll in the woods, what?

    What sort of firearm is your favorite to take 'em with?

  7. #507
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronbarSinister
    Sonofabitch, year-round open season on wild pigs in Texas?

    OMG that sounds delicious. Are they hard to hunt? Do you stalk, push, sit in a stand, just take a stroll in the woods, what?

    What sort of firearm is your favorite to take 'em with?
    ...usually hunt at night with night vision equipment. Some of my brothers friends he hunts with use some high end thermal sights that are way out of my price range just for the scopes! I like to use a .308 as it has the knock down power to take a hog down at range. When I hunt with him we usually ride the ranch roads in electric golf carts as they are quiet. Here on the coast I just drive to a rice or sorghum field and pop them as they come out of the tree line.
    The State is even considering a new law that will allow wild hogs to be hunted from helicopters on Wildlife Management Areas (WMA's) to try and bring the numbers down as they are so destructive and are messing with the native animals such as deer and antelope. You can kill thousands of them and not even make a dent in the hog population down here they are so thick!

  8. #508
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    Oh wow that sounds awesome.
    I would like to go down there some day for some hog killin'!
    I think my M1903 .30-06 would be just the ticket!
    The AR-15 in 5.56mm NATO is probably a bit too small eh?

    How do they taste compared to farm-raised domestic pork?

  9. #509
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronbarSinister
    Oh wow that sounds awesome.
    I would like to go down there some day for some hog killin'!
    I think my M1903 .30-06 would be just the ticket!
    The AR-15 in 5.56mm NATO is probably a bit too small eh?

    How do they taste compared to farm-raised domestic pork?
    ...the AR would work but they have what I would best call a "breast plate" that is right behind their front legs and to get a clean shot and knock them down you have to be dead on. 5.56 I would consider a little too light a round. The meat has a much better taste than what you would purchase I think and is very lean. For instance to make sausage you have to add fat to it!

  10. #510
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    ....haven't posted anything new as I have been pretty busy for the last month or so.

    ....BUT....am on vacation this upcoming week and have a ton of stuff that needs to be thrown on the Pit. Will fire up the vid camera tomorrow to show what I am smoking this afternoon (some beef Ya Jackwagons!) and show you how a good brisket as well as some ribs should turn out. As much Pecan and Red Oak smoke as I have coming off the t-shirt I am wearing me thinks I ought to be selling these darn things! Smells good enough to eat on it's own! :lol:

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